509-380-9102  |   estates@gravislaw.com

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Estate Planning Attorneys

Your Estate is unique and so are you. Our Estate Planning Attorneys have one goal:  to provide simple, smart solutions, without complication. It’s what makes us different.  We don’t draft unnecessary documents and free our clients from long term maintenance whenever possible. It’s our promise to find you the most effective and economical way to protect your estate and your family. Contact one of our estate planning attorneys and let’s talk. 

Call today: 509-380-9102

or click below

Powers of Attorney

Alongside and apart from the Wills and Trusts aspect of estate planning, having an effective durable power of attorney in place for both financial and health care decisions is a must.

Living Will

A living will designates what medical procedures a client wishes to be subjected to in the event of a terminal and permanent condition.

Wills & Trusts

We offer a free consultation to first assess what instrument(s) or service(s) will best fit your situation without overdoing it and incurring unnecessary costs or maintenance.

Click on a Specific Area Above to Get Started

Or feel free to contact us using the form and information on the left.

Call Today:509-380-9102  |  email us: estates@gravislaw.com

Planning for the Future

Our Estate Planning Attorneys focus on your goals and your unique situation. 

Believe it or not, you have an estate. In fact, nearly everyone does. Your estate is comprised of everything you own— your car, home, other real estate, checking and savings accounts, investments, life insurance, furniture, personal possessions. No matter how large or how modest, everyone has an estate and something in common—you can’t take it with you when you die.

It's not a matter of 'if', it's a matter of 'when'.

When that happens—and it is a “when” and not an “if”—you probably want to control how those things are given to the people or organizations you care most about. To ensure your wishes are carried out, you need to provide instructions stating whom you want to receive something of yours, what you want them to receive, and when they are to receive it. You will, of course, want this to happen with the least amount paid in taxes, legal fees, and court costs.

If you don’t have a plan, your state has one for you, but you probably won’t like it.
At disability: If your name is on the title of your assets and you can’t conduct business due to mental or physical incapacity, only a court appointee can sign for you. The court, not your family, will control how your assets are used to care for you through a conservatorship or guardianship (depending on the term used in your state). It can become expensive and time consuming, it is open to the public, and it can be difficult to end even if you recover.

That is estate planning—making a plan in advance and naming whom you want to receive the things you own after you die. However, good estate planning is much more than that.

It should also

  • Include instructions for passing your values (religion, education, hard work, etc.) in addition to your valuables.
  • Include instructions for your care if you become disabled before you die.
  • Name a guardian and an inheritance manager for minor children.
  • Provide for family members with special needs without disrupting government benefits.
  • Provide for loved ones who might be irresponsible with money or who may need future protection from creditors or divorce.
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